Cancer clinical trials – Ireland

Cancer trials test new and more effective ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer.

Trials can involve testing new drugs or combinations of commonly used drugs, new therapies, new ways of treating cancer, or new ways of diagnosing cancer.

They may test new radiotherapy schedules, surgical techniques, medical devices, or physical therapies. They can also involve investigating blood samples and tissues.

Current practice of colonoscopy surveillance in patients with lynch syndrome: A multicenter retrospective cohort study in Japan

Current guidelines recommend that patients with Lynch syndrome should have colonoscopy surveillance every 1–2 years starting at the age of 20–25. However, insufficient data are available to evaluate the quality and safety of colonoscopy surveillance for patients with Lynch syndrome nationwide in Japan.

The proportion of patients developing cancer was significantly higher with a >24 months than a ≤24 months interval.

Conclusion

High-volume experienced endoscopists and appropriate surveillance intervals may minimize the risk of developing colorectal cancers in patients with Lynch syndrome.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/deo2.179

Does social media matter when it comes to understanding our own health?

What stories and what science do we find and share online when we are striving to connect with other “patients” or “carers” like us?

In this podcast, Stefania takes the case of two family cancer syndromes (BRCA and Lynch) to explore the way social media can shape everyday coping with the diagnosis of a rare or little known health condition.

https://offtheshelf.org.uk/event/digital-media-use-for-health-and-illness-dr-stefania-vicari/

What does being “research active” mean for clinicians and their patients?

“Being research active, in my opinion, is fundamentally about our willingness and diligence, as patients, to ask questions and seek high quality evidence either as a patient, a health professional, and from an organisational standpoint.

As patients we need to ask for the evidence. We should be able to read about the findings in plain English. We must be part of a meaningful and informed conversation. We should have guidance on the questions to ask about whether to take part in research. We must be kept informed about the progress of individual studies. We should be able to find out how to get involved with researchers to inform, shape, and influence all aspects of the process. A research active patient might be described as purposely enquiring about evidence to support their own health.

For health professionals it may be about asking how research can assist in all stages of the patient pathway. It is where research moves from being a last option to a helpful guide. … research active health professional might then mean being fully engaged with research as a means of benefiting patients through networking with colleagues and the public.”

Enhance Study

Would you like to share your views on treatments for depression for patients with cancer?

Resistant Starch Provides Lasting Benefit in Lynch Syndrome

Regular bowel screening and aspirin reduce colorectal cancer among patients with LS but extracolonic cancers are difficult to detect and manage. This study suggests that RS reduces morbidity associated with extracolonic cancers.

Taking a supplement of 30 grams of “resistant starch” a day – about the amount in two slightly unripe bananas – reduced the risk of multiple forms of cancer in people with Lynch Syndrome

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2330638-starch-supplement-reduces-the-risk-of-some-hereditary-cancers/?fbclid=IwAR2NMmNDRsS2FnG6mNQhM8UqGuBlCGld3xAfKtV2hPG6laYP8RkRAqWDTVY

Can a vaccine help prevent Lynch syndrome-related cancers?

The clinical trial will investigate a preventive vaccine designed to recognise multiple mutated proteins frequently found in patients with Lynch syndrome.

They are hoping to immunise patients who are cancer-free with those shared foreign mutated proteins so that the immune system will be prepared, if a patient develops a tumour, to reject it.

https://www.mdanderson.org/cancerwise/can-a-vaccine-help-prevent-lynch-syndrome-related-cancers.h00-159538956.html?fbclid=IwAR0XOtXdpBBRgTQQXg3zli6keXMsvSsoTTNVOCHyb3emilZKFgGvOIHeYXc

Cancer Prevention with Resistant Starch in Lynch Syndrome Patients in the CAPP2-Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial: Planned 10-Year Follow-up 

Prevention Relevance:

Regular bowel screening and aspirin reduce colorectal cancer among patients with LS but extracolonic cancers are difficult to detect and manage. This study suggests that RS reduces morbidity associated with extracolonic cancers.

https://aacrjournals.org/cancerpreventionresearch/article/doi/10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-22-0044/707189/Cancer-Prevention-with-Resistant-Starch-in-Lynch#.Yt81Yyez1xk.twitter

European guidelines from the EHTG and ESCP for Lynch syndrome: an updated third edition of the Mallorca guidelines based on gene and gender(2021)

The recommendations from the EHTG and ESCP for identification of patients with Lynch syndrome, colorectal surveillance, surgical management of colorectal cancer, lifestyle and chemoprevention in Lynch syndrome that reached a consensus (at least 80 per cent) are presented.

https://academic.oup.com/bjs/article/108/5/484/6287132?login=false

%d bloggers like this: