thisisGO.ie is an online personalised resource for you and yours who have been impacted by a gynaecological cancer.

This programme is part of the Irish Cancer Society’s Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), the aim of which is to improve health and wellbeing for women impacted by cancer who are dealing with the side effects and consequences of treatment.

Phases of thisisGO

Phase 1 was launched on September 20th 2021.  It is a personalised
online resource for women impacted by cervical cancer. If you have a partner in
your life, this platform can also support them. If you are a health care
provider working in the area this can also support you and your
practice. 

If you are newly diagnosed, receiving treatment, in surveillance
or living well with and beyond cancer thisisGO.ie has information that is
tailored to meet your needs.

Phase 2 covered ovarian cancer and was launched on the 4th of
February 2022

Next Phase due shortly will cover Genetic Cancers including BRCA and Lynch Syndrome

It is hoped that the remaining three gynaecological cancer and
GO cancer genetics will be complete before the end of 2022.

Each gynaecological cancer has different symptoms.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms in the chart below for more than two weeks, please make an appointment to see your doctor to discuss further.

You may feel embarrassed discussing some of these symptoms, this is normal, your doctor is here to help, and it may save your life.

(www.thisisgo.ie)

Biomarkers in Colon Cancer: What Does High Microsatellite Instability Mean?

Tumours that are MSI high have a lot of mutations on their surface. A lot of mutations are needed for the immune system to recognise the cancer.
For the majority of solid tumours, the immune system doesn’t really care that you have cancer.
But in tumours that are MSI-High, they have a lot of proteins on their surface that are kind of like signs for the immune system to say ‘Hey, I’m here! Come fight me!’ And then the immune system sees those mutations, kicks in, and sends T cells.

If the tumour is dMMR/MSI-H, additional tests are required to determine if the MSI-H is caused by Lynch syndrome….”

B E A T OVARIAN CANCER

Did you know that more Irish women die from ovarian cancer than any other European country? I didn’t.

One of the main reasons for this is because symptoms can be vague, and the majority of women (75%) are diagnosed with late-stage disease.

Neither of us want to be part of these statistics but symptoms can be vague and similar to other conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome.

Contact your GP if you have any of these BEAT symptoms for three weeks or more as these may be warning signs of ovarian cancer:

                            ·  B loating that is persistent and doesn’t come and go 

                            ·  E ating less and feeling full more quickly 

                            ·  A bdominal and pelvic pain you feel most days 

                            ·  T oilet changes in urination or bowel habits 

https://www.rte.ie/player/series/today/SI0000000197?epguid=IH000403530

Dr Doireann O’Leary (@WorldOvarianCancerDay @RTEToday) talks about the importance of being symptom aware and shares the meaning of BEAT.

She also talks about the importance of ‘the big T’, ie getting Treatment early. If someone has these symptoms it likely is something less serious than Ovarian Cancer but the most important thing is not to brush it off, do go to your GP and get checked and try to get in to the habit of doing that. Building this habit greatly increases the chances of early diagnosis.


A GP blood test that could help diagnose ovarian cancer faster and more accurately

https://www.wellbeingofwomen.org.uk/news/a-gp-blood-test-that-could-help-diagnose-ovarian-cancer-faster-and-more-accurately

“This is the first time that HE4 has ever been evaluated in a primary care setting, so it will be exciting to see larger-scale studies implemented to further assess its effectiveness as a diagnostic aid. Earlier diagnosis will have important implications for women’s treatment, care and ultimately, survival.”

People diagnosed with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk for colorectal, endometrial and other cancers.

If you have been diagnosed with Lynch syndrome, you have may questions about your medical care. This page from the USA has information on cancer risk, screening, prevention and treatment for people with an inherited mutation in a Lynch syndrome gene. 

Outdated medical language that casts doubt, belittles, or blames patients jeopardises the therapeutic relationship and is overdue for change?

https://www.bmj.com/content/377/bmj-2021-066720

Key messages

  • Some commonly used language in healthcare confers petulance on patients, renders them passive, or blames them for poor outcomes
  • Such language negatively affects patient-provider relationships and is outdated
  • Research is needed to explore the impact that such language could have on patient outcomes
  • Clinicians should consider how their language affects attitudes and change as necessary

Uptake of hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in carriers of pathogenic mismatch repair variants: a Prospective Lynch Syndrome Database report

Highlights

Premenopausal oophorectomies in patients not at increased risk of ovarian cancer.•

Uptake of risk-reducing surgery (RRS) in Lynch syndrome aligns poorly with cancer risk and mortality.•

Uptake of RRS does not correspond well with current clinical guidelines.•

There is an unmet need for multidisciplinary planning to avoid repeated surgery.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959804921001052?fbclid=IwAR2iWs_WEl3FOo1sPf3pLpUDC5TQNhwOnaA4tPTRnojQ42PJLIBXy_q_aXw

Ovarian Cancer UK Statistics

These upcoming cancer vaccines may prevent tumors before they appear

A vaccine against cancers caused by Lynch syndrome — an inherited disorder — will be among the first to test if a vaccine can stop nonviral cancers from appearing. The Lynch trial is among several looking to test a new generation of preventative cancer vaccines.

Recently, scientists have discovered that a type of immune cell known as a T cell is capable of recognizing the unique signatures of a tumor cell — and giving them the business. 

Therapies designed to increase T cell’s killing power and ability to target cancer after it appears have already been approved, and they can be quite successful at treating some cancers. (More recent work is recruiting another type of immune cell, the awesomely named natural killer cells, to fight cancer.)

https://www.freethink.com/health/preventative-cancer-vaccines

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