Lynch  Syndrome  Ireland

Ongoing research being conducted at the School of Psychology, NUI Galway about experiences as a Lynch Syndrome carrier in Ireland.

The Final Blog

“A mad Christmas spending spree

And presents around the tree
The gift I require
To escape from this mire
Is to be told that I’m cancer free!
Patrick thank you.Gone but not forgotten.

Bowel Cancer Man

Since my husband Patrick died in January this year it’s felt very special to continue his blog. Over the last few months, I’ve shared my experience of grief and the impact of Patrick’s illness and death on our family.  There’s no tidy ending with these life changing events but it feels a natural place to stop so this will be the last update to the blog. As I bring the blog to a close I thought I’d share my thoughts on what it’s meant for me, and leave you with Patrick’s Christmas bowel cancer limericks which he wrote in December 2018.

Patrick started this blog after he was diagnosed with stage 4 bowel cancer in June 2017. Those early months were a blur as we all faced up to the reality of a terminal diagnosis and adjusted to a life full of uncertainty, endless appointments, chemotherapy, and Patrick’s new stoma…

View original post 927 more words

Risk-reducing hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in female heterozygotes of pathogenic mismatch repair variants

Conclusion: Little benefit is gained by performing RRS before 40 years of age and premenopausal BSO in path_MSH6 and path_PMS2 heterozygotes has no measurable benefit for mortality. These findings may aid decision making for women with LS who are considering RRS.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33257847/

Prof. Sue Clark talking about bowel cancer in Lynch Syndrome.

Lots to digest including her thoughts on total v partial colectomy for people with Lynch Syndrome.

Talking with your Children about Lynch Syndrome

Why talk to Family members about Lynch Syndrome?

Gynecological Risk Reduction in Lynch Syndrome

Lynch Syndrome Surveillance

Lynch Syndrome – Basic Information

Sharing information about hereditary cancer with children

Kids learn as much from what we do as from what we say

%d bloggers like this: